Summit Industrial Products

Menu

Summit Headlines

FAQ: What oils should we avoid mixing?

March 23, 2018

A Q&A with Thomas Knight, Summit’s Development Chemist

Can we mix oils? What can we mix? What can’t we mix?
There are many different types of base stocks or oils out there. The most common oil is mineral oil, so let's just start there. We have Group 1, which is higher in sulfur and higher in aromatics. And then we have Group 2, which has less aromatic or less saturates and less sulfur, therefore it's a cleaner oil. Those mix fine together. There's not an issue with mineral oils because any mineral oil can mix with any other mineral oil. Additionally, they also now have Group 3 oils (which are highly refined Group 2 oils). Mineral oils, which we just described, come out of the ground and are then refined.

Synthetics, on the other hand, are produced. You have polyalphaolefins (PAO), which are chemically made synthetic hydrocarbons. PAO oils have the same basic ingredients as a mineral oils, except that they're made under tight conditions where they can be highly branched. They can have absolutely no saturates.

That's why we consider them synthetics, right?

Yes. PAO oils are actually produced synthetically from a gas stream, and they mix fine with mineral oils because they are basically carbon and hydrogen just like mineral oils. The difference is that the PAO oils are highly refined, therefore they work at both higher and lower temperatures and they have less of a tendency to oxidize.

Additionally, there are other oils, like esters, that can be mixed with this group. A lot of esters are used as plasticizers in industry. We use esters in our oils to give the oil solvency. There also base stocks, like alkylated naphthalenes, which are a little bit new but can be mixed as well. For example, one that's come along that will mix well with oil is a product called oil soluble polyglycols (OSP). Oil soluble polyglycols, like esters and alkylated naphthalenes, are polar and have a solvency to them.

Everything I’ve talked about thus far mix with oil and do fine. Whether you should mix them or not depends on the application and the desired result, but at the very least it’s not unsafe.

The ones that don't mix well, the ones you have to be concerned with, are silicone oils and perfluorinated types (PFAE). These are also synthetic oils, but silicone oils will not mix with standard oils like PAO oils, mineral oils, esters, alkylated naphthalenes, polyglycols and OSP.

Close

ISO 9001

Summit Industrial Products first received its ISO 9002 certification in January of 1996, demonstrating a commitment to quality assurance and performance monitoring. ISO 9000 certification is an international quality standard that addresses a comprehensive list of business elements, including management responsibility, order processing, purchasing, process control, traceability, handling of non-conforming product, and internal auditing. Our present ISO 9001:2008 certification is proof of our continuing quality commitment to our customers.

Close

ISO 14001

Summit is committed to protecting the environment, the health and safety of our employees, customers and communities where we work and live. We recognize that through integrating sound environmental health, and safety management practices into all aspects of our business ... we can offer innovative products and services while conserving and enhancing resources for future generations.

Close

NSF ISO 21469

ISO 21469 specifies hygiene requirements for the formulation, manufacture, use and handling of lubricants, which may come into contact with products during manufacturing or processing. The international standard applies to lubricants intended for use in food production, as well as cosmetic, pharmaceutical and animal feed industries. NSF ISO 21469 Certification by an independent, third party provides Summit with a means to obtain international acceptance for their products.